Endocrine Disruptors

Strong scientific evidence shows that pesticides do not cause endocrine-related diseases or conditions such as cancer, diabetes or obesity.

Strong scientific evidence shows that pesticides do not cause endocrine-related diseases or conditions such as cancer, diabetes or obesity. Multiple factors may account for increases in endocrine-related diseases or conditions independent of endocrine active substances, such as lifestyle, diet, body weight and improvements in diagnostic methods. However, for most endocrine-related human diseases frequently discussed, causes are simply not known. Several possible risk factors include genetics, age and maternal age.

Pesticides are evaluated for potential adverse effects on reproduction and development. Risk assessment considers sensitive populations (pregnant women, embryos, fetuses and newborns) and time periods (pregnancy, infancy, childhood and puberty) when the endocrine systems of humans and wildlife are most vulnerable.

Human exposure to pesticides is orders of magnitude lower than exposure to common, natural and more potent endocrine active substances like sugar, caffeine and soy protein.

Testing for Endocrine Activity

Testing includes multi-generational reproduction studies in laboratory animals that assess potential impacts throughout life. These studies are conducted at extremely high doses – levels to which humans and wildlife will not be exposed. In fact, human exposure to pesticides is orders of magnitude lower than exposure to common, natural and more potent endocrine active substances like sugar, caffeine and soy protein.

A range of short- and long-term studies on the effects of pesticide active ingredients on living beings and ecosystems are performed to determine if they may cause adverse effects. All of these studies are conducted according to international regulatory testing guidelines. Tests evaluate potential adverse effects in both vertebrates (including mammals, fish and birds) and invertebrates (i.e., insects, worms and shellfish). Some short-term tests are also done on formulated products.

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